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Lip Filler at Home

Lip filler at home is popular nowadays as it is the most simple and hassle-free cosmetic procedure that could quickly provide you with fuller and plumper lips. Most of the girls go for the lip filler procedure as is help improve the volume of your lips. The main thing while you go for the lip filler is that you must choose the correct lip filler that contains a substance similar to hyaluronic acid. The proper use of the lip filler could provide you with beneficial results, and you could flaunt your big pouty lips.

The at-home fillers for lips must be used with anaesthetics to avoid the pain during the treatment. Nowadays, you will be able to get the lip fillers in various places as the practitioner does not require any correct training for using the lip fillers treatment.

It is effortless to use lip fillers at home as you need to get a local anaesthetic before applying the lip filler. After the anaesthetic, you need to inject the lip filler in a series of small injections.

What are the possible side effects of Lip filler?

There is a minimal side-effect of Lip filler, and they are just temporary and last for a few days. Some of the possible side effects of at-home lip injection are bleeding from the affected area, swelling, redness, irritation, and lumps in the lips.

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At Home Botox Injection

At home, Botox injection is the best treatment that could cause a form of muscle paralysis as it blocks the signal from the nerve to the muscles. Botox’s primary purpose is that it is used on the forehead lines, for chin dimpling, lines in the nose, skin bands on the neck, and much more. The best thing about Botox injection is that it is the drug that is used in small doses in order to treat some muscle condition and to reduce skin wrinkles.

You must know that the Botox is the protein made from botulinum toxin. But this toxin must be used correctly and in small doses as it is extremely toxic. This toxin has many beneficial medical and cosmetic uses if it is used correctly.  You could also get at home Botox injection that effectively useful for common facial area problems. Botox is also used for improving the appearance of the hairs. The cosmetics and the healthcare professional use Botox for many different conditions that are related to muscle.  

What the use and side effect of is at home Botox Injection?

At home, Botox injection is used for resolving many common facial areas problems like:-

  • Wrinkles around the eyes.
  • Horizontal increase in the forehead.
  • Frown lines and the lines in the corner of the mouth.

At home, Botox injection has much more use other than the points mentioned above. Some of the side effects of Botox injection are like mild pain, swelling, headache, numbness, and much more.

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Coronavirus, COVID-19

Coronavirus Testing

What is coronavirus testing?

Coronavirus testing looks for signs of a coronavirus infection in nasal secretions, blood, or other body fluids. Coronaviruses are types of viruses that infect the respiratory system. They are found in both animals and people. Coronavirus infections in people are common throughout the world. They don’t usually cause serious illness.

Sometimes a coronavirus that infects animals will change and turn into a new coronavirus that can infect people. These coronaviruses can be more serious and sometimes lead to pneumonia. Pneumonia is a life-threatening condition in which fluid builds up in the lungs.

Three of these new coronaviruses have been discovered in recent years:

  • SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome), a serious and sometimes fatal respiratory illness. It was first discovered in China in 2002 and spread around the world. An international effort helped quickly contain the spread of disease. There have been no new cases reported anywhere in world since 2004.
  • MERS (Middle East respiratory syndrome), a severe respiratory illness discovered in Saudi Arabia in 2012. The illness has spread to 27 countries. Only two cases have been reported in the United States. All cases have been linked to travel or residence in or around the Arabian Peninsula.
  • COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019). It was discovered in late 2019 in Wuhan City, in the Hubei Province of China. Most infections have occurred in China or are related to travel from Hubei Province. There have been some cases reported in United States. The outbreak is being closely monitored by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO).

How is it used?

Coronavirus testing is used to help diagnose infections and help prevent the spread of disease.

Why do I need a coronavirus test?

You may need testing if you have symptoms of infection and have recently traveled to parts of the world where infection rates are high. You may also need testing if you have had close contact with someone who has traveled to one of those areas.

Symptoms of coronavirus infections include:

Symptoms of COVID-19 are usually milder than those of SARS and MERS.

The symptoms of COVID-19 include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

If you have symptoms and have not traveled to areas where infection rates have been high or been exposed to someone who has, it’s highly unlikely that you have one of these new coronaviruses. You may have another type of virus, such as the flu. The flu is much more common in the United States than the new coronaviruses.

What happens during coronavirus testing?

If your provider thinks you may have COVID-19, he or she will contact the CDC or your local health department for instructions on testing. You may be told to go to a special lab for your test. Only certain labs have been allowed to do tests for COVID-19.

There are a few ways that a lab may get a sample for testing.

  • Swab test. A health care provider will use a special swab to take a sample from your nose or throat.
  • Nasal aspirate. A health care provider will inject a saline solution into your nose, then remove the sample with gentle suction.
  • Tracheal aspirate. A health care provider will put a thin, lighted tube called a bronchoscope down your mouth and into your lungs, where a sample will be collected.
  • Sputum test. Sputum is a thick mucus that is coughed up from the lungs. You may be asked to cough up sputum into a special cup, or a special swab may be used to take a sample from your nose.
  • Blood. A health care professional will take a blood sample from a vein in your arm.

The FDA has approved more widespread use of a rapid test for COVID-19. The test, which was developed by the CDC, uses samples from the nose, throat, or lungs. It enables fast, accurate diagnosis of the virus. The test is now allowed to be used at any CDC-approved lab across the country.

Will I need to do anything to prepare for this test?

Your health care provider may ask you to wear a facemask to your appointment. Your provider will let you know if you should take other steps to prevent the spread of infection.

Are there any risks to the test?

You may feel a tickle or a gagging sensation when your nose or throat is swabbed. The nasal aspirate may feel uncomfortable. These effects are temporary.

There is a minor risk of bleeding or infection from a tracheal aspiration.

There is very little risk to having a blood test. You may have slight pain or bruising at the spot where the needle was put in, but most symptoms go away quickly.

What do the results mean?

If your results were positive, it means you probably have a coronavirus infection. There is no specific treatment for these infections, but your health care provider may recommend steps to relieve your symptoms. These include:

  • Drinking plenty of fluids
  • Resting
  • Taking over-the-counter pain relievers

You may need to go to the hospital if your symptoms get worse, which may be a sign of pneumonia. Symptoms of pneumonia include a worsening cough, increased trouble breathing, and a high fever.

If you were diagnosed with a coronavirus infection, you should also take the following steps to prevent others from getting sick:

  • Stay home, except to get medical care.
  • Wear a facemask when you are around other people.
  • Do not share drinking glasses, eating utensils, towels, bedding, or other items with people in your home.
  • Cough or sneeze into your sleeve or a tissue, not your hands.
  • Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

If your results were negative, you may need further testing and/or an exam by your provider. Until you get a diagnosis, you will still need to take steps to prevent spreading the infection.

Is there anything else I need to know about coronavirus testing?

You can lower your risk of getting an infection by taking the following steps:

  • Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • When possible, keep away from people who are coughing and sneezing.
  • Clean frequently-touched objects and surfaces with a household disinfectant spray or wipe.

Get the latest information on COVID-19.

The medical information provided is for informational purposes only, and is not to be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please contact your health care provider with questions you may have regarding medical conditions or the interpretation of test results.

In the event of a medical emergency, call 911 immediately.

References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [Internet]. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2019 Novel Coronavirus: 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Situation Summary; [updated 2020 Feb 7; cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/summary.html
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [Internet]. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2019 Novel Coronavirus: CDC Tests for 2019-nCoV; [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/testing.html
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [Internet]. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2019 Novel Coronavirus: Interim Clinical Guidance for Management of Patients with Confirmed 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Infection; [updated 2020 Jan 30; cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 4 screens]. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/clinical-guidance-management-patients.html
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [Internet]. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2019 Novel Coronavirus: Interim Guidelines for Collecting, Handling, and Testing Clinical Specimens from Persons Under Investigation (PUIs) for 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV); 2020 Feb 2 [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 4 screens]. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/lab/guidelines-clinical-specimens.html
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [Internet]. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2019 Novel Coronavirus: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers; [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html
  6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [Internet]. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2019 Novel Coronavirus: Prevention and Treatment; [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/prevention-treatment.html
  7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [Internet]. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2019 Novel Coronavirus: What to do if you are sick with 2019 Novel Coronavirus; (2019-nCoV); [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/steps-when-sick.html
  8. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [Internet]. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Coronavirus: Human Coronavirus Types; [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/types.html
  9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [Internet]. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS): About MERS; [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/mers/about/index.html
  10. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [Internet]. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS): MERS in the U.S.; [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/mers/us.html
  11. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [Internet]. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS): People Who May Be at Increased Risk for MERS; [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/mers/risk.html
  12. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [Internet]. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS): About SARS; [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/sars/about/index.html
  13. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [Internet]. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS): Frequently Asked Questions About SARS; [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/sars/about/faq.html
  14. FDA: U.S. Food and Drug Administration [Internet]. Silver Spring (MD): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; FDA Takes Significant Step in Coronavirus Response Efforts, Issues Emergency Use Authorization for the First 2019 Novel Coronavirus Diagnostic; 2020 Feb 4 [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 4 screens]. Available from: https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-takes-significant-step-coronavirus-response-efforts-issues-emergency-use-authorization-first
  15. Familydoctor.org [Internet]. Leawood (KS): American Academy of Family Physicians; c2020. Coronavirus; [updated 2020 Jan 28; cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://familydoctor.org/condition/coronavirus
  16. Illinois Department of Public Health [Internet]. Springfield (IL): Illinois Department of Public Health; c2020. 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV): Frequently Asked Questions; [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 6 screens]. Available from: http://dph.illinois.gov/topics-services/diseases-and-conditions/diseases-a-z-list/coronavirus/faq
  17. Kids Health from Nemours [Internet]. Jacksonville (FL): The Nemours Foundation; c1995–2020. Coronavirus; [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/coronavirus.html
  18. Lab Tests Online [Internet]. Washington D.C.: American Association for Clinical Chemistry; c2001–2020. Influenza Tests; [updated 2020 Jan 9; cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 2 screens]. Available from: https://labtestsonline.org/tests/influenza-tests
  19. Maryland Department of Public Health [Internet]. Baltimore: Maryland.gov; c2020. MDH Coronavirus Physician Letter; 2020 Jan 31 [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://phpa.health.maryland.gov/IDEHASharedDocuments/MDH-Coronavirus-Clinician-Letter_1.31.2020.pdf
  20. Mayo Clinic [Internet]. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; c1998–2020. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS): Overview; 2019 Sep 24 [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sars/symptoms-causes/syc-20351765
  21. Mayo Clinic [Internet]. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; c1998–2020. Novel coronavirus: What is it and how can I protect myself?; 2020 Jan 29 [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/infectious-diseases/expert-answers/novel-coronavirus/faq-20478727
  22. Merck Manual Consumer Version [Internet]. Kenilworth (NJ): Merck & Co Inc.; c2020. New Coronavirus Outbreak in Humans; 2020 Jan 24 [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 2 screens]. Available from: https://www.merckmanuals.com/home/news/editorial/2020/01/24/15/48/new-coronavirus-outbreak-in-humans
  23. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Blood Tests; [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/blood-tests
  24. UF Health: University of Florida Health [Internet]. Gainesville (FL): University of Florida Health; c2020. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) Overview; [updated 2020 Feb 8; cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 2 screens]. Available from: https://ufhealth.org/middle-east-respiratory-syndrome-mers
  25. University of Rochester Medical Center [Internet]. Rochester (NY): University of Rochester Medical Center; c2020. Health Encyclopedia: Bronchoscopy; [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 2 screens]. Available from: https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?contenttypeid=92&contentid=P07743
  26. University of Rochester Medical Center [Internet]. Rochester (NY): University of Rochester Medical Center; c2020. Health Encyclopedia: Pneumonia; [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 2 screens]. Available from: https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?contenttypeid=85&contentid=P01321
  27. University of Rochester Medical Center [Internet]. Rochester (NY): University of Rochester Medical Center; c2020. Health Encyclopedia: Sputum Culture; [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 2 screens]. Available from: https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?contenttypeid=167&contentid=sputum_culture
  28. World Health Organization [Internet]. Geneva (SUI): World Health Organization; c2020. Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS-CoV); 2019 Mar 11 [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/middle-east-respiratory-syndrome-coronavirus-(mers-cov)
  29. World Health Organization [Internet]. Geneva (SUI): World Health Organization; c2020. Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Situation Report – 20; 2020 Feb 9 [cited 2020 Feb 10]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://www.who.int/docs/default-source/coronaviruse/situation-reports/20200209-sitrep-20-ncov.pdf?sfvrsn=6f80d1b9_4
  30. World Health Organization [Internet]. Geneva (SUI): World Health Organization; c2020. Q and A on Coronaviruses; 2020 Feb 2 [cited 2020 Feb 8]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronaviruses

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Health

Autism spectrum disorders and regenerative therapy

Autism and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) refer to a range of conditions characterized by impaired social and communication skills and repetitive behaviors caused by different combinations of genetic and environmental influences. Although the pathophysiology underlying ASD is still unclear, recent evidence suggests that immune dysregulation and neuroinflammation play a role in the etiology of ASD. In particular, there is direct evidence supporting a role for maternal immune activation during prenatal life in neurodevelopmental conditions. Currently, the available options of behavioral therapies and pharmacological and supportive nutritional treatments in ASD are only symptomatic. Given the disturbing rise in the incidence of ASD, and the fact that there is no effective pharmacological therapy for ASD, there is an urgent need for new therapeutic options. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory properties that make them relevant to several diseases associated with inflammation and tissue damage. The paracrine regenerative mechanisms of MSCs are also suggested to be therapeutically beneficial for ASD. Thus the underlying pathology in ASD, including immune system dysregulation and inflammation, represent potential targets for MSC therapy. This review will focus on immune dysfunction in the pathogenesis of ASD and will further discuss the therapeutic potential for MSCs in mediating ASD-related immunological disorders

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Health

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Round-Up (Case Review)

Public awareness has been on the news associating the herbicide Roundup™ and Non Hodgkin-lymphoma. Today’s short article introduces you to the glyphosate urine test.

Glyphosate is the world’s most widely produced herbicide and is the primary toxic chemical in Roundup™. Glyphosate was introduced in the 1970s to kill weeds.

Recent studies have discovered glyphosate exposure to be a cause of many chronic health problems. It can enter the body by direct absorption through the skin, by eating foods treated with glyphosate, or by drinking water contaminated with glyphosate.

Possible cancers linked to glyphosate exposure include non-Hodgkin lymphoma, renal tubule carcinoma, pancreatic islet-cell adenoma, and skin tumors.

The following results of one of my patients had high levels of glyphosate and with appropriate treatment we were able to reduce the glyphosate toxicity.

First test

Follow-up re-test

Treatment of glyphosate toxicity should be centered on determining the route of introduction and avoiding future exposure. Eating non-GMO (genetically modified organism) foods and drinking reverse osmosis water are two of the best ways to avoid glyphosate. A recent study showed that people eating organic food had considerably lower concentrations of glyphosate in the urine.

The specific treatment for this patient was to avoid or at least reduce eating non-organic foods and infrared sauna.

There are two supplements that are particularly useful in helping the body detoxify.  The first is Superior Anti Aging.   Glutathione is one of the most common molecules used by the body to eliminate toxic chemicals.  If you are constantly exposed to toxicants your stores of glutathione could be depleted.  The second supplement is vitamin B3 (niacin).

I was happy to see a 50% reduction of glyphosate.

 

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Health

Alzheimer’s: Why is the Brain Deteriorating?

 

After considerable research it is interesting to bring you up to speed on documented evidence of things which answer the question. “Why is the human brain deteriorating faster than the rest of the body?”

There are a multitude of factors and today’s article will touch on a few and also provide some solutions.

For starters I find it disturbing and somewhat criminal that a common blood pressure medication called calcium channel blockers has been proven radiologically on MRI to cause brain shrinking. Research has shown that these drugs cause deterioration of the I.Q. within 5 years’ use.

Another medication used to lower cholesterol called Lipitor causes a decline in brain function. It is important to know that statin cholesterol-lowering drugs like Lipitor poison the liver’s synthesis of cholesterol. This in turn will starve the brain of cholesterol needed to repair the brain, renew worn out membranes, and stave off Alzheimer’s.

In fact, an excellent book, “Lipitor Thief of Memory” written by the respected medical doctor, former astronaut, aerospace medical research scientist, flight surgeon, and family doctor, Dr. Duane Graveline, shares his rapid mental decline after taking the drug Lipitor. Worth reading.

Even with all this hard evidence can you believe the pharmaceutical industry has created a potent drug which combines both the calcium channel blocker and a statin called Atorvastatin/Amlodipine (Caduet). Talk about a double punch to optimal brain function!

Moving on to another documented contributor of Alzheimer’s, we can’t forget the unavoidable heavy metals. We all have them in us and they poison brain repair enzymes, leading to Alzheimer’s.

For example, there is no one who doesn’t have aluminum in them, from eating out, aluminum cookware, aluminum flocculation agents in municipal drinking waters, aluminum in baking powders used in breads, processed and restaurant foods cooked in aluminum vats, industrial and vehicular exhausts, deodorants, antacids, and many other sources.

Aluminum causes the nerves in the brain to actually get tangled up (neurofibrillary tangles) as well as make a glue-like substance (called amyloid) to gum up the normal workings of the delicate brain electricity..

Now to provide some nutritional answers to reduce amyloid production we need to look no further than Phosphatidylserine (PS). This nutritional powerhouse has shown to perk up memory, and stave off Alzheimer’s.  One interested case showed PS in 3 months return the memory back to where it was 12 years earlier.

Most recently there has been evidence how DHA is an amyloid eater.

Well here is something even easier: green tea. Real organic green tea has over 3 catechins or polyphenols. They have been found to be potent preventers of amyloid deposition in the brain. Sencha Premium Organic Green Tea is by far the best I have found.

This short article is simply a glimpse of the research you won’t see promoted on CNN or Fox News. Of course this is sad. There is another side of the clinical management of many diseases that the public will rarely if ever be shown unless you are a reader of my weekly health reports or other alternative or functionally oriented heath professional reports or journals.

The take away from today’s article is to “NOT” be your own doctor but seek out the assistance and help from someone trained and skilled in functional medicine who can properly evaluate you and outline a personalized program to help you get well.